USGBC Announces Nevada is 6th in the Nation for LEED Green Building


Contact

Mari St. Martin
Communications Director
(775) 684 - 5679
CARSON CITY, NV - January 26, 2016

Governor Brian Sandoval today announced the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) released its national ranking of the top states in the country for LEED green building and Nevada ranked sixth in the nation for 2015. Data from USGBC's 2015 Green Building Economic Impact Study show LEED construction is expected to support 96,000 jobs in Nevada and impact state GDP by $8.55 billion from 2015-2018. LEED-certified spaces use less energy and water resources, save money for families, businesses and taxpayers, reduce carbon emissions and create a healthier environment for residents, workers and the community.

"This is another sign that Nevada is developing as a national leader in merging innovative technologies with practical and commercial application. Building LEED-certified spaces will help our cities and communities grow in a smart, energy-efficient way and helps maximize the potential of the state's thriving renewable energy industry," said Governor Brian Sandoval. "As Nevada's population continues to rapidly increase, it is important that we integrate sustainable measures in our growth to ensure preservation of our precious natural resources. I would like to thank the many Nevadans who made obtaining these prestigious certifications a priority and thank the Council for spotlighting our state."

"The State of Nevada is a nationwide leader in green building and LEED certification. LEED creates jobs and increases opportunities for Nevada's workers and businesses while contributing billions of dollars to the state's economy," said Rick Fedrizzi, CEO and founding chair of USGBC. "LEED has become an essential standard for the transformation of building design and construction. LEED certified buildings drive economic growth, creates jobs and makes communities healthier."

"Nevada's success in attracting LEED certified or equivalent buildings shows the commitment our state has taken to lead the way in integrating energy efficiency and conservation with growth and new development," said Angela Dykema, Director of the Governor's Office of Energy. "Through state programs which are both environmentally and business-friendly like the Green Building Tax Abatement program administered by the Governor's Office of Energy, these projects not only maximize operational efficiency while minimizing environmental impacts, but also contribute greatly to Nevada's economy through the capital improvements, jobs and taxes paid. We look forward to continuing our work with the USGBC to promote green building and LEED certification in Nevada."

 

Nevada Statistics:
   Rank: 6th
   State Projects Certified in 2015: 30
   Square Feet LEED Certified in 2015: 6,534,960
   Per Capita Square Footage: 2.42

The annual ranking is developed by analyzing each state in terms of square feet of LEED certified space per state resident. Now in its sixth year, the list highlights states throughout the country that made significant strides in sustainable building design, construction and transformation throughout 2015. Nevada certified 30 projects representing 6,534,960 square feet of real estate, or 2.42 square feet per resident, in 2015.

A few notable projects that certified in Nevada in 2015 include:

  • Levi Strauss & Co.'s Sky Harbor Distribution Center (DC), LEED Platinum
  • Clark County Wetlands Park Nature Center, LEED Gold
  • North Las Vegas Readiness Center, LEED Silver
  • The Chefs Warehouse Las Vegas, LEED Certified

In Nevada, 30 commercial and institutional projects became LEED certified in 2015, representing 6,534,960 square feet of real estate. Worldwide, 4,837 projects were certified in 2015, representing 818.9 million square feet. Nearly 75,000 projects representing 14.4 billion square feet of space have been LEED-certified to date.
USGBC calculates the list using per-capita figures as a measure of the human element of green building. This also allows for fair comparisons among states with significant differences in population and number of buildings.

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